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U.S. Lung Cancer Trends

Over the last several decades, the number of new lung cancer cases as well as the number of lung cancer deaths among U.S. men has decreased, mostly likely because the number of men who smoke has declined. Among U.S. women however, lung cancer deaths are among the highest in the world because the reductions in smoking women have been more recent.

Incidence Trends

 

In the U.S., incidence of lung cancer has:

Decreased significantly by 1.8% per year from 1991-2006 among men.

Decreased significantly by 1.8% per year from 1997-2006 among white men.

Decreased significantly by 2.7% per year from 1997-2006 among African American men.

Decreased significantly by 3.2% per year from 1997-2006 among American Indians/Alaska Native men.

Decreased significantly by 2% per year from 1997-2006 among Asian/Pacific Islander men.

Decreased significantly by 2.5% per year from 1997-2006 among Hispanic men.

Decreased significantly by 0.7% per year from 1997-2006 among Hispanic women.


Remained level from 1997-2006 among African American women.

Remained level from 1997-2006 among American Indians/Alaska Native women.

Remained level from 1997-2006 among Asian/Pacific Islander women.


Increased significantly by 0.2% per year from 1997-2006 among white women.


(“Significantly” refers to statistical significance. 2006 is the latest year for which data are available.)



Death Trends


In the U.S., deaths from lung cancer have:

Decreased significantly by 2.0% per year from 1994-2006 among men.

Decreased significantly by 1.8% per year from 1997-2006 among white men.

Decreased significantly by 0.1% per year from 1997-2006 among white women.

Decreased significantly by 2.9% per year from 1997-2006 among African American men.

Decreased significantly by 1.5% per year from 1997-2006 among Asian/Pacific Islander men.

Decreased significantly by 0.8% per year from 1997-2006 among Asian/Pacific Islander women.

Decreased significantly by 3.3% per year from 1997-2006 among American Indians/Alaska Native men.

Decreased significantly by 2.6% per year from 1997-2006 among American Indians/Alaska Native women.

Decreased significantly by 3.0% per year from 1997-2006 among Hispanic men.

Decreased significantly by 0.8% per year from 1997-2006 among Hispanic women.


Remained level from 2003-2006 among women.

Remained level from 1997-2006 among African American women.


(“Significantly” refers to statistical significance. 2006 is the latest year for which data are available.)